Posts Tagged ‘DUSK’

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One of my first images with the LX3, taken on the day I got it. I remember not having had it for long – maybe an hour or two – and this is image number 290 ! And there were very many more shots taken that day … and ever since.

Maybe that’s a good indicator of just how much enjoyment I got from this LX3, and which I still do today. This image was shot at The Jaipur building, in Milton Keynes. It’s a feat of Eastern-style architecture, beautifully built and amazing to look at, especially in good daylight.

The night-lighting of this all-white structure is inventive, and has certainly been carefully thought-out. As a very recognisable part of the MK skyline, it’s also a great photographic subject. I was pleased to capture this image at dusk on that first day with the LX3, and although the original file was already bursting with colour, I’ve also run it through DxO FilmPack on an ‘Agfa Ultra Color’ film type.

Although not as over-the-top as it may have been (I’m talking saturation), the colours have been enhanced, yet remain close to reality …

There are many more LX3 images, including several architectural, cityscape and urban image folders, at http://nickbland.zenfolio.com … hope you enjoy them.

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Thanks to its Leica-logo’d f2-2.8 lens, the LX3 has proven itself to be a stunning low-light camera. There’s a feeling amongst many that shooting in low-light is a relatively rare requirement, and that most photography – literal translation from latin being ‘drawing with light’ – takes place when there’s some light to draw with !

Well, for those of us in the UK who are finding that, this week at least, there’s some real summer weather, we all know that this can’t generally be relied upon, in this green & pleasant land;  conditions are more normally much cooler, wetter, and often overcast. Thus, there’s a real need here for ‘low-light ability’ in a camera, and the light-gathering capability of an f2 (at 24mm equiv.) to f2.8 (at 60mm equiv.) lens really makes a difference.

The fact that it’s a really sharp one, with little noticeable distortion following processing, really helps to produce what I feel is a way better quality of low-light image than the output of the previous champ – the infamous Fuji F30. As I still have my F30 (and amazingly still in pretty well ‘as new’ condition), it’s been easy to make a direct comparison. LX3 has far more detail, less smearing, and its fast lens allows a lower ISO to be used, further reducing the possibility of noise that needs noise reduction, and the artifacts associated. If you want to replace an F30/31, the LX3 is also a far better performer in bright light conditions.

This dusk shot, from my collection of Canary Wharf/Docklands images, is a good example of what’s possible, handheld, under such conditions. That the full gamut of colour remains intact is also testament to the quality of LX3, that just wasn’t possible on a small camera even 18 months ago – we have much to be thankful for !

More LX3 low-light (and ‘normal-light’ !) shots in new & updated galleries … just go to http://nickbland.zenfolio.com and choose from the many subjects, each in their own folder for ease of use.