web1067x600-P1120811NX

In a way, I’m revisiting here a couple of recent posts with new comment below added in the light of news over the last week or so … three hot topics as the title of this entry.

DSLR publications – can these be at all relevant to LX3 users ?

On a positive note, in observing a few of the recent/current mag covers I’ve shown above – some from the USA, but mostly UK issues, I still really enjoy learning all I can on photography, and getting different angles (ouch!) on imaging, as well as gaining an insight into maybe some new piece of software, or a different technique, that deserves attention. Sometimes it can be just for inspiration, or can trigger an idea that had been filed away in the grey matter.

The ‘DSLR’ mention – in mag name(s), front cover headlines, and of course inside … well, you know my opinion on that from my June 9th post – but there is something valuable in these issues, that can be very useful to all LX3 users, especially new ones that may have moved up from a standard pre-set point & shoot. No, it’s not a DSLR …there’s no interchangeable lens for starters – although it has a lens spec : f2-2.8, 24-60mm full-frame equivalent – that every SLR user would love if they could afford it. Some might say it’s the perfect range anyway, so no need to change. As a comparison, the lens I use most of the time on my D3 covers 24-70mm, but at f2.8 all the way …and is the best of that range that Nikon makes/has ever made !  Back to LX3, there’s no pentaprism, so reduced weight, no mirror slap, smaller form factor… ok, and a smaller sensor, for now. 

But, LX3 is a fully-manual camera, if you want it to be. That means that apart from all the ‘consumer’ stuff on there, you’ve Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority settings on the dial, as well as the crucial ‘M’ …so you can control lens aperture and shutter speed independantly, exactly as on a DSLR. And record a high-quality RAW file. This means that you may find such mags a great help in getting into the Manual settings on your new LX3 , to get the very best out of it – and I recommend you do that asap for better, & much more creative results. Promise I won’t mention magazines again today.

E-P1 … the first of many new m4/3 models

These designer types – you know, the guys (and girls, no doubt) that we are all deeply appreciative of, for their frankly amazing technological achievements, are extremely talented, but in my own experience are often not very good at communicating with real people.

Olympus is different. Their verbose technical guy/spokesman has seemingly been quoted in the last few days that E-P1 is the first of many m4/3-design cameras that will see the light of day in the relatively near future – for all of us, this could be very good news. Different models, different specs and features, smaller cameras, larger models ….very good news indeed.

Because this means that Panasonic will have to already have their competing range well into the prototype/pre-prod stages if they’re to fight their corner on such cameras, and meet what are now, thanks to LX3, G1, GH1, etc very high global market expectations.

So, you can wait a while … or, you can just buy (or keep on using, if you already have one) the LX3, safe in the knowledge that so far, at anywhere near its price point or form factor, there’s nothing to touch it for the range within which it works. But then, you expected me to say that.

The reality is that the LX3 will remain a totally valid tool even later on … the E-P1/2/3 etc lens line-up so far doesn’t get close to the LX3’s stunning built-in Leica 24mm f2, and that, in combination with the LX3’s 16:9 format, remains a real favourite of mine.

Go to http://nickbland.zenfolio.com for many new & updated LX3 galleries, separated into different subject areas for your ease of use … and enjoy !  Incidentally, they’re pretty well all in 16:9 format, my own preference.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Phil Stanley says:

    As an Olympus (E3), Nikon (D700) and Panny (LX3) owner I am very excited about Oly’s offering.
    Whilst the EP1 is not for me, I think future offerings may well meet my needs with EVF etc.

    Even better if Panny bought out an LX3 size cam with the 4/3 sensor, weight is becoming a factor with me and the D700 rarely leaves home

  2. nickbland says:

    Phil,
    Thanks for your note. I agree that these developments are exciting to the photographic community, and we’re now just into a new era where past experience alongside real innovation is coming to the fore.
    E-P1 doesn’t tick enough boxes for me (it’s not a Panasonic, for starters !), although I’m sure there’ll be some versions coming from both O & P that will combine the right elements according to what’s needed. Exciting times.
    All the best,
    Nick

  3. Juha Haataja says:

    You discuss well the E-P1 vs. LX3 question, especially the versatility of the 24-60 mm f/2.0 lens. I was at first very interested in the Olympus E-P1, but now I’m having second thoughts. My LX3 is an excellent (and pocketable!) photographic tool, which is hard to surpass. I’m now at over 50,000 images taken with the LX3, and there may be another 50,000 images to be taken with it.

    • nickbland says:

      Juha,
      Good to hear from you, thanks for your comment. The E-P1 has been hugely interesting for many of us, but the reality is probably that what we already have in our hands (LX3) is ideal for many uses … until LX4/5 ?! Impressed that you’re up to 50k images already on your LX3, and that it seems to be holding up very well … I’m sure you’ll at least match that again, and look forward to seeing many more of your fine shots from Finland on your Lightscrape blog ! (http://lightscrape.blogspot.com)
      All the best,
      Nick

  4. Juha Haataja says:

    Nick – thanks. I stumbled recently on your blog and will follow it from now on, excellent work.

  5. I am really happy to glance at this web site posts which contains plenty of helpful
    information, thanks for providing such statistics.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s